WaterFilters.NET

What is turbidity?

by wfnblog on May 16, 2012


Raise your glass of water and hold it up to the light. Does the water seem hazy? If so, the water is turbid. Your water lacks its inherent clarity or brilliance. Turbidity describes how cloudy or clear your water is. It is a key factor in evaluating water quality. Turbidity is measured in terms of […]

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National Drinking Water Week 2012 is coming to an end. Even after the official celebration ends, we remain dedicated to building awareness of global water issues–at home, at the tap and beyond. With that in mind, we are excited to be able to give a substantial gift to Thirst Relief International this week. Thirst Relief […]

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It’s only late spring, and already many of us in certain parts of the country have had our fill of negative attack ads. It leaves us wondering how we can honor the political process as responsible citizens, but maintain a more civil dialogue. If we want to see a change in our political and cultural […]

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What are cysts?

by wfnblog on April 17, 2012


According to the Environmental Protection Agency, oocsyts (commonly known as cysts) are “a stage in the life-cycle of some protozoa.” They are not bacteria or viruses, but one-celled organisms in an early phase of development, very much like a microscopic egg. Waterborne protozoan parasites, such as Cryptosporidum and Giardia lamblia are resistant to chlorine and […]

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What is lead?

by wfnblog on April 5, 2012


Atomic number 82 on the periodic table, lead is represented by “Pb” in the list of elements. Lead is a soft metal used in construction of buildings, manufacture of weights and various other industrial applications. Humans have been mining and using this heavy metal for thousands of years, poisoning themselves in the process. Although lead […]

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What is chlorine?

by wfnblog on March 29, 2012


Atomic number 17 on the periodic table, chlorine is a naturally occurring element that is used extensively as a disinfectant in public water treatment plants to eliminate bacteria. Chlorine has been added to disinfect drinking water since the early twentieth century, making it possible to minimize more effectively the spread of waterborne diseases. Chlorine works […]

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What is sediment?

by wfnblog on March 23, 2012


One simple definition of sediment is matter suspended in a liquid that will (given time) settle to the bottom. It is naturally occurring material that is broken down by weathering and erosion, and then transported elsewhere by various forces–in our case, water. It ranges from very fine silt through sand and dirt, and includes gravel, […]

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What is a micron?

by wfnblog on March 14, 2012


Astoundingly, a micron (short for micrometer) is one-millionth of a meter. As such, it is also one thousand times smaller than a millimeter. Particles on this scale usually can’t be seen with your eyes. For example, the diameter of a human hair, which averages 75 microns wide, is very hard to discern without the use […]

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We hear the names of scary-sounding chemicals, when we catch bits and pieces in news reports. Environmental studies warn of perchlorate, the ingredient in rocket fuel which has been found in municipal drinking water systems in twenty-six states to date.  And then there are the pesticides… and antibiotics… and E coli bacteria. More than 60,000 […]

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Everyday household activities are a major source of polluted runoff, seriously jeopardizing our groundwater. Every time it rains, extra fertilizer on lawns, oil spilled on driveways, residue from paints and solvents used on walls and decks all end up contaminating our waterways as chemicals.  Even the neighborhood’s pet population can contribute to the problem, when […]

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